Four Top Tips for Aspiring Virtual Assistants

 

by Claire Grace, Founder and CEO, The Assistant Quarters

Are you just starting your Virtual Assistant journey?

Take a minute to read these four tips to help you get up-and-running, the right way.

After working in banking and as an Executive Assistant, Claire founded The Assistant Quarters to support “creative and visionary women in business whose only limitations are having enough hours in the day.”

Claire and her team provide a range of services – from administrative support and project management, through to social media management and event planning. Their goal is to support clients to “escape the overwhelm that can come from balancing the running of a business with the most important role of being a mum.” Claire is also a mum herself with a lively toddler, and knows all too well what it takes to juggle life and work.

Claire was kind enough to share four key tips for anyone just starting out on their VA journey:

1. Think about your own skills and preferences, and define your USP

Virtual Assistant is such a broad term  – VA business owners can specialise in so many areas that often the title does the industry a disservice!

You might have traditional PA/EA skills – or you might have a background in social media or marketing, or even website design.

All VAs do need to have great people skills and organisational skills. However, beyond that, think about the skills you have and then come up with services or packages that use those and fix common ‘pain points’ for your potential clients.

Don’t get hung up on the VA title – just use it as a starting point to think about what you can offer and what you love doing!

Claire Grace, Founder and CEO of The Assistant Quarters

 

2. Define your ideal clients – who do you want to work with?

Be clear about how you want to work, and who you want to work with. Who are your ideal clients? Think about the industry they are in or the type of business they have. What’s their personality and style of working?

Think, too, about your work pattern and how you want to work. What would suit you and your family best? Once this is clear, you can start defining your offer.

Really knowing who your ideal clients are will also be of help once you are up and running. Don’t be afraid to turn away work that isn’t a good fit. It can be hard to turn away clients in the beginning, but be patient, and the right sort of work will come!

“Be clear about how you want to work, and who you want to work with. Who are your ideal clients?…Don’t be afraid to turn away work that isn’t a good fit.” 

3. Find your community, and use it to find support and training

Do your research and find an online VA community. Working from home can be a lonely business, but there are many VA facebook groups that offer a good way to connect with others.

From my experience, the VIP VA Hub is a fantastic resource for new and experienced VAs.

They also offer great training or 1:1 coaching if you are new to running a business and want to learn more about the essentials of setting up a successful VA business.

4. Use your existing network

Once you’re ready to go, start telling the world about your new VA business. For example, tell family, friends and your current business network (such as past colleagues.)

You will be surprised how many people want to know more. My first few clients were all people I knew well already.

You can get started in a low-key way. For example, you don’t necessarily need to wait until you have a website to start taking on clients! I managed to launch my business and run it without a website for almost seven months.

A very big thank you to Claire Grace from The Assistant Quarters.  

If you’re thinking about making the leap from PA to VA, do check out Claire’s blog on just that topic – it’s got some great ideas for anyone thinking of launching a new career as a Virtual Assistant.

 

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